Use Property Tax Relief To Sell Your Home Faster & Pocket More This Summer

Long Islanders could tap available property tax relief to sell their Nassau and Suffolk County homes faster and put more money in their pockets this summer.

Summer is known as the peak home buying season in the real estate industry. This summer many out of area buyers will be on the prowl for a place on Long Island, while many locals will be looking to move up, down or out.

The big obstacle for all parties is bound to be New York’s reputation for ridiculously high property taxes. Fortunately, with help on hand many could slash their property tax bills to sell homes quickly and for more.

For those that are behind on property taxes some relief could help reduce debts, meaning that they can actually sell without having to come out of pocket or put the difference in their own pockets for a nice bonus.

Reducing tax assessments on a home could potentially also make a property more attractive to active home buyers, and will certainly make it more affordable.

Even a few thousand dollars cut off of a tax bill can mean the difference in tens of thousands more a home can be sold for. Broken down by monthly housing payments a couple hundred dollars difference can mean many more buyers will qualify to buy a property and find the payments palatable.

The larger the pool of potential buyers the higher the odds of multiple offers coming in, and an even higher final sales price.

Even if you aren’t sure you want to move yet, this can still be a very savvy money move.

Contact Property Tax Adjusters, Ltd. to find out if you qualify to have your taxes reduced now…

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Testimonials

“I have saved on my own real estate taxes for many years. As well, any clients I have referred have also saved on their taxes and advised they were very happy with the service and results received from Property Tax Adjusters. It is without hesitation that I refer interested persons, friends and clients alike, to Property Tax Adjusters for assistance on reducing their taxes.”
Herbert G. Pitkowsky, Esq.