Teachers Union Sues to Force NY Property Tax Increases

Property taxes in New York are already 70% higher than the national average, with some of the highest in the country seen in Nassau and Suffolk County. However, if United Teachers, the largest teachers union in the state gets its way those taxes could sky rocket far higher.

A good percentage of the property tax bills on Long Island come from school related taxes. Now the teachers union is suing to nullify the law capping property tax increases.

United Teachers claims the law locks in inequality and wants to push property taxes higher. It’s obviously a tough tightrope walk for Long Island residents, at least those with kids. They clearly want a good education for their kids and should be able to get a decent one. In fact it is in everyone’s best interest that our children get a good education.

However, on the other hand (without sparking an all-out online brawl), many would argue that the unions and inefficient school systems are to blame and that much more could be done with the money that is coming in instead of having to raise everyone else’ property tax to pay their wages.

It is said that senate republicans plan to fight to protect the tax cap, though they don’t seem to have had much luck at winning much lately.

Either way, in reality the cap is commonly broken through anyway, essentially making it a mute issue, it’s just a matter of how much Long Island property taxes will surge this year.

Those wanting to duck huge increases in their tax bills this year only have until May 1st to file a property tax appeal.

What do you think? Should Long Island residents be paying more taxes? Or do schools need to get more efficient?

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